Trips Agreement Purpose

Article 35 of the TRIPS agreement obliges Member States to protect the design of integrated circuits in accordance with the provisions of the IPIC Treaty (Intellectual Property Treaty, taking into account integrated circuits) negotiated in 1989 under the aegis of WIPO. These provisions include definitions of the integrated circuit and layout design (topography), protection requirements, exclusive rights and restrictions, and use, registration and disclosure. An integrated circuit refers to a product in its final form or an intermediate form in which the elements, of which at least one is an active element, and some or all connections are formed in full in and/or on a piece of material and must perform an electronic function. A layout design (topography) is defined as the three-dimensional layout, in terms or not, of elements of which at least one is an active element, and by some or all connections of an integrated circuit or a three-dimensional layout prepared for an integrated production circuit. The obligation to protect layout designs applies to layout designs that are original in the sense that they are the result of the intellectual efforts of their creators and are not commonplace for layout designers and integrated circuit manufacturers at the time of their creation. Exclusive rights include the right to reproduce and the right to import, sell and distribute for commercial purposes. There are restrictions on these rights. The exclusive rights that must be granted through a product patent are rights that are manufactured, used, sold, sold and imported for these purposes. The protection of process patents must be entitled not only to the use of the procedure, but also to the products obtained directly by the process. Patent holders also have the right to transfer or transfer the patent to the right and to enter into licensing agreements (Article 28).

The TRIPS agreement is the only international agreement that details respect for intellectual property rights, including rules on evidence, interim measures, compensation measures and other sanctions. It states that courts must, under certain conditions, have the right to order the disposal or destruction of property that violates intellectual property rights. Intentional infringement or commercial-scale copyright piracy must be punishable. Governments must also ensure that IP rights holders are provided with assistance from customs authorities to prevent the importation of counterfeit and illegally manufactured goods. The Agreement on Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) was negotiated between 1986 and 1994 as part of the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), which led to the creation of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The TRIPS agreement sets minimum levels for different types of intellectual property protection, including copyright, trademarks, patents, industrial design and trade secret protection.